B
84.4 / 100
Domain, IP Address & Port Number
sales.tehrancement.co.ir
(217.66.213.200:443)
Assessment Time & Date
Oct. 13, 2021, 1:37 p.m.
Assessment Duration
Seconds 42
.Based on "cipherlist_LOW" test, which shows an obsolete and insecure result, your grade has dropped to B
.Based on "RC4" test, which shows an obsolete and insecure result, your grade has dropped to B

SSL Certificate

Is the certificate still valid? YES
Certificate Issue Date 2021-03-10 10:37
Certificate Expiration Date 2022-03-10 10:37
Trust Chain Health Healthy
Certificate Issuer Certum Domain Validation CA SHA2 (Unizeto Technologies S.A. from PL)
Is the certificate valid for sales.tehrancement.co.ir? YES
This test checks if the server supports SSL‌v3 or not. SSLv3 is a broken, hence, unsafe protocol and must not be used.

Protocol Information

SSLv2 Your server does not support SSLv2 which is good since it is an insecure protocol.
This test checks if the server supports SSL‌v2 or not. SSLv2 is a broken, hence, unsafe protocol and must not be used.
SSLv3 Your server does not support SSLv3 which is good since it is an insecure protocol.
This test checks if the server supports SSL‌v3 or not. SSLv3 is a broken, hence, unsafe protocol and must not be used.
TLS1 Your server supports TLSv1.0. This protocol is now considered as a weak protocol. You are advised to disable support for this protocol.
This test checks if the server supports SSL‌v3 or not. TLS1.0 is an almost two-decade old protocol. This protocol is vulnerable against attacks such as BEAST and POODLE. Additionally, TLSv.10 supports weak cipher suits which further makes it an insecure protocol. Starting June 30, 2018, websites will need to stop supporting TLS 1.0 to remain PCI compliant.
TLS1.1 Your server supports TLSv1.1. This protocol is now considered a weak protocol. You are advised to start supporting more advanced protocols.
TLS1.1 does not have known major vulnerabilities. But, similar to TLS1.1 it supports weak cipher suits that are not proper for modern use.
TLS1.2 Your server supports TLSv1.2. Currently, this protocol is considered stable. But you'd better consider supporting TLS v1.3.
Currently, TLS1.2 is a stable and secure protocol to go with before TLS1.3 is officially announced as the only accepted protocol.
TLS1.3 Your server does not support TLSv1.3. We strongly advise supporting this protocol.
TLS1.3 is going to be the stable secure protocol in the near future and it is recommended that every server shift to this protocol.

Cipher Suites

NULL Your server does not support NULL ciphers.
Description: The cipher suites with a "NULL" do not offer data encryption, only integrity check. This means "not secure" for most usages. Validation Conditions: This test is passed if the certification is not expired.
aNULL Your server does not support aNULL ciphers.
Description: For a certificate to be trusted and valid it should not be expired. Validation Conditions: This test is passed if the certification is not expired.
EXPORT Your server does not support EXPORT ciphers.
Description: The cipher suites with "EXPORT" are, by design, weak. They are encrypted, but only with keys small enough to be cracked with even amateur hardware (say, a basic home PC -- symmetric encryption relying on 40-bit keys). These suites were defined to comply with the US export rules on cryptographic systems, rules which were quite strict before 2000. Nowadays, these restrictions have been lifted and there is little point in supporting the "EXPORT" cipher suites. Validation Conditions: This test is passed if the server does not support EXPORT ciphers.
LOW Your server supports LOW ciphers which are considered insecure ciphers.
Description: For a certificate to be trusted and valid it should not be expired. Validation Conditions: This test is passed if the certification is not expired.
3DES_IDEA Your server supports 3DES ciphers which is considered an insecure cipher.
Description: For a certificate to be trusted and valid it should not be expired. Validation Conditions: This test is passed if the certification is not expired.
AVERAGE Your server supports AVERAGE ciphers which are considered insecure ciphers.
Description: For a certificate to be trusted and valid it should not be expired. Validation Conditions: This test is passed if the certification is not expired.
Strong Your server support strong ciphers.
Description: For a certificate to be trusted and valid it should not be expired. Validation Conditions: This test is passed if the certification is not expired.

PFS Information

PFS‌ Overview Your server supports Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS)
Description: Perfect Forward Secrecy guarantees different encryption keys per session. Thus, if a session key is compromised, other previously recorded sessions (by attacker) will be safe. Validation Conditions: This test is passed if your server supports robust perfect forward secrecy.
Ciphers that support PFS. List of ciphers that support perfect forward secrecy (PFS).
Description: This test derives the ciphers that your server uses and depicts the ones that support perfect forward secrecy. ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384 DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256 ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256 ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA DHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256 DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA
Analysis of ECDH‌ Curves Your server uses strong ECDHE keys for key exchange.
Description: Elliptic-curve Diffie–Hellman (ECDH) is a key agreement protocol that allows two parties, each having an elliptic-curve public–private key pair, to establish a shared secret over an insecure channel. This shared secret may be directly used as a key, or to derive another key. The key, or the derived key, can then be used to encrypt subsequent communications using a symmetric-key cipher. It is a variant of the Diffie–Hellman protocol using elliptic-curve cryptography. Validation Conditions: This test will pass if ECDH is correctly implemented.
Analysis of the strength of Diffie-Hellman Keys Your server uses strong Diffie-Hellman keys for key exchange.
Description: Diffie–Hellman key exchange is a method of securely exchanging cryptographic keys over a public channel and was one of the first public-key protocols. Diffie–Hellman is used to secure a variety of Internet services. However, research published in October 2015 suggests that the parameters in use for many DH Internet applications at that time are not strong enough to prevent compromise by very well-funded attackers, such as large governments. Validation Conditions: This test will pass if the keys are of standard strength.

Vulnerabilities

Analyzing Heartbleed Vulnerability Your connection is immune against heartbleed attack.
Description: 'Heartbleed' was a critical vulnerability in SSL which would enable an adversary to retrieve sensitive information from the corresponding server. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server is not vulnerable to this attack.
Analyzing CCS Vulnerability Your connection is immune against CCS attack.
Description: OpenSSL before 0.9.8za, 1.0.0 before 1.0.0m, and 1.0.1 before 1.0.1h does not properly restrict processing of 'ChangeCipherSpec' messages, which allows man-in-the-middle attackers to trigger use of a zero-length master key in certain OpenSSL-to-OpenSSL communications, and consequently hijack sessions or obtain sensitive information, via a crafted TLS handshake, aka the 'CCS Injection' vulnerability.
Analyzing Ticketbleed Vulnerability An error occurred during this test. please report this problem.
Description: 'The Ticketbleed-Bug' was a programming error in enterprise-level hardware. This bug allows a remote attacker to extract up to 31 bytes of uninitialized memory at a time. This memory can potentially contain key material or sensitive data from other connections. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server is not vulnerable to 'ticketbleed-bug'. not applicable, not HTTP
Analyzing ROBOT vulnerability Your connection is immune to ROBOT attack.
Description: ROBOT is the return of a 19-year-old vulnerability that allows performing RSA decryption and signing operations with the private key of a TLS server. In 1998, Daniel Bleichenbacher discovered that the error messages given by SSL servers for errors in the PKCS #1 v1.5 padding allowed an adaptive-chosen ciphertext attack; this attack fully breaks the confidentiality of TLS when used with RSA encryption. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the sever is not vulnerable to the ROBOT‌ attack.
Analyzing Secure Renegotiation Your connection is immune against secure_renego attack.
Description: The TLS protocol, and the SSL protocol 3.0 and possibly earlier, as used in Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) 7.0, mod_ssl in the Apache HTTP Server 2.2.14 and earlier, OpenSSL before 0.9.8l, GnuTLS 2.8.5 and earlier, Mozilla Network Security Services (NSS) 3.12.4 and earlier, multiple Cisco products, and other products, does not properly associate renegotiation handshakes with an existing connection, which allows man-in-the-middle attackers to insert data into HTTPS sessions, and possibly other types of sessions protected by TLS or SSL, by sending an unauthenticated request that is processed retroactively by a server in a post-renegotiation context, related to a "plaintext injection" attack, aka the "Project Mogul" issue. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server is not vulnerable to this bug. not applicable, not HTTP
Analyzing Client-initiated Secure Connection Your server is properly configured to support Secure Client Renegotiation.
Description: The TLS protocol, and the SSL protocol 3.0 and possibly earlier, while implemented on many different products, cannot perform a renegotiation handshake correctly. This allows attackers to use a man-in-the-middle attack to insert data into HTTPS sessions, and possibly other types of sessions protected by TLS or SSL, by sending an unauthenticated request that is processed retroactively by a server in a post-renegotiation context, related to a "plaintext injection" attack, aka the "Project Mogul" issue. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server does not have this vulnerability.
Analyzing protection against CRIME Attack Your connection is immune against CRIME_TLS attack.
Description: CRIME (Compression Ratio Info-leak Made Easy) is a security exploit against secret web cookies over connections using the HTTPS and SPDY protocols that also use data compression. When used to recover the content of secret authentication cookies, it allows an attacker to perform session hijacking on an authenticated web session, allowing the launching of further attacks. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server is not vulnerable to CRIME attack.
Analyzing protection against poodle attacks Your connection is immune against poodle_ssl attack.
Description: The POODLE attack (which stands for 'Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption') is a man-in-the-middle exploit which takes advantage of Internet and security software client's fallback to SSL 3.0. If attackers successfully exploit this vulnerability, on average, they only need to make 256 SSL 3.0 requests to reveal one byte of encrypted messages. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server is not vulnerable to poodle attacks
Analyzing Protection Against Freak Attack Your connection is immune against FREAK attack.
Description: FREAK ("Factoring RSA Export Keys") is a security exploit of a cryptographic weakness in the SSL/TLS protocols. A man-in-the-middle, with only a modest amount of computation could break the security of any website that allowed the use of 512-bit export-grade keys. Validation Conditions: This test is passed it the server is not vulnerable to this attack.
Analyzing protection against DROWN Attacks. Your connection is immune against DROWN attack.
Description: The DROWN attack is a cross-protocol security bug that attacks servers supporting modern TLS protocol suites by using their support for the obsolete, insecure, SSLv2 protocol to leverage an attack on connections using up-to-date protocols that would otherwise be secure. DROWN can affect all types of servers that offer services encrypted with TLS yet still support SSLv2, provided they share the same public key credentials between the two protocols. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server is not vulnerable to DROWN attacks.
Analyzing existence of common primes in public/private encryption key pairs. Your connection is vulnerable to LOGJAM-Common_Primes attack.
Description: Millions of HTTPS, SSH, and VPN servers all use the same prime numbers for Diffie-Hellman key exchange. Practitioners believed this was safe as long as new key exchange messages were generated for every connection. However, the first step in the number field sieve, the most efficient algorithm for breaking a Diffie-Hellman connection is dependent only on this prime. After this first step, an attacker can quickly break individual connections. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server is not using common prime numbers that would make it vulnerable.
Analyzing protection against LOGJAM Attack Your connection is immune against LOGJAM attack.
Description: The LOGJAM attack allows a man-in-the-middle attacker to downgrade vulnerable TLS connections to 512-bit export-grade cryptography. This allows the attacker to read and modify any data passed over the connection. The attack is reminiscent of the FREAK attack, but is due to a flaw in the TLS protocol rather than an implementation vulnerability, and attacks a Diffie-Hellman key exchange rather than an RSA key exchange. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server is not vulnerable to LOGJAM attacks
Analyzing CVE-2011-3389 vulnerability Your connection is vulnerable to BEAST_CBC_TLS1 attack.
Description: The SSL protocol, as used in certain configurations in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Opera, and other products, encrypts data by using CBC mode with chained initialization vectors, which allows man-in-the-middle attackers to obtain plaintext HTTP headers via a blockwise chosen-boundary attack (BCBA) on an HTTPS session, in conjunction with JavaScript code that uses (1) the HTML5 WebSocket API, (2) the Java URLConnection API, or (3) the Silverlight WebClient API, aka a "BEAST" attack. This category of attack is closely related to the next one, namely, BEAST attacks. Validation Conditions: This test is passed if the server is not using Encryption in CBC mode. ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA AES256-SHA AES128-SHA DES-CBC3-SHA
Analyzing BEAST vulnerability Your connection is vulnerable to BEAST attack.
Description: Short for Browser Exploit Against SSL/TLS, SSL Beast is an exploit first, revealed in late September 2011, that leverages weaknesses in cipher block chaining (CBC) to exploit the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol. The CBC vulnerability can enable man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks against SSL in order to silently decrypt and obtain authentication tokens, providing hackers with access to the data passed between a Web server and the Web browser accessing the server. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server is not vulnerable to BEAST attacks. VULNERABLE -- but also supports higher protocols TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2 (likely mitigated)
Analyzing luck13 vulnerability Your connection is vulnerable to LUCKY13 attack.
Description: The Lucky Thirteen attack is a cryptographic timing attack against implementations of the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol that use the CBC mode of operation. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the sever is not vulnerable to this bug. potentially vulnerable, uses TLS CBC ciphers
Analyzing RC4 vulnerability An error occurred during this test. please report this problem.
Description: The RC4 algorithm, as used in the TLS protocol and SSL protocol, does not properly combine state data with key data during the initialization phase, which makes it easier for remote attackers to conduct plaintext-recovery attacks against the initial bytes of a stream by sniffing network traffic that occasionally relies on keys affected by the Invariance Weakness, and then using a brute-force approach involving LSB values, aka the "Bar Mitzvah" issue. Validation Conditions: This test passes if the server does not utilize RC4 in its cipher suits. VULNERABLE, Detected ciphers: RC4-SHA RC4-MD5

Cipher Suite Assessments

TLSv1
  1. TLS-ECDHE-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-ECDHE-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-DHE-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-DHE-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-3DES-EDE-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-RC4-128-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-RC4-128-MD5
TLSv1.1
  1. TLS-ECDHE-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-ECDHE-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-DHE-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-DHE-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-3DES-EDE-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-RC4-128-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-RC4-128-MD5
TLSv1.2
  1. TLS-ECDHE-RSA-WITH-AES-256-GCM-SHA384
  1. TLS-ECDHE-RSA-WITH-AES-128-GCM-SHA256
  1. TLS-DHE-RSA-WITH-AES-256-GCM-SHA384
  1. TLS-DHE-RSA-WITH-AES-128-GCM-SHA256
  1. TLS-ECDHE-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA384
  1. TLS-ECDHE-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA256
  1. TLS-ECDHE-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-ECDHE-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-DHE-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-DHE-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-AES-256-GCM-SHA384
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-AES-128-GCM-SHA256
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA256
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA256
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-AES-256-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-AES-128-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-3DES-EDE-CBC-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-RC4-128-SHA
  1. TLS-RSA-WITH-RC4-128-MD5

Browser Simulations

Client Cipher Suite Protocol
ANDROID-442 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ANDROID-500 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
ANDROID-60 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
ANDROID-70 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ANDROID-81 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ANDROID-90 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ANDROID-X TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
CHROME-74-WIN10 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
CHROME-79-WIN10 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
FIREFOX-66-WIN81 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
FIREFOX-71-WIN10 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
IE-6-XP N/A No Connection
IE-8-WIN7 TLSv1.0 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA
IE-8-XP TLSv1.0 DES-CBC3-SHA
IE-11-WIN7 TLSv1.2 DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
IE-11-WIN81 TLSv1.2 DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
IE-11-WINPHONE81 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256
IE-11-WIN10 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
EDGE-15-WIN10 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
EDGE-17-WIN10 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
OPERA-66-WIN10 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
SAFARI-9-IOS9 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
SAFARI-9-OSX1011 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
SAFARI-10-OSX1012 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
SAFARI-121-IOS-122 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
SAFARI-130-OSX-10146 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
APPLE-ATS-9-IOS9 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
JAVA-6U45 N/A No Connection
JAVA-7U25 TLSv1.0 ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA
JAVA-8U161 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
JAVA1102 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
JAVA1201 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
OPENSSL-102E TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
OPENSSL-110L TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
OPENSSL-111D TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
THUNDERBIRD-68-3-1 TLSv1.2 ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384